Pokémon Go is finally fixing its biggest problem for most players

Business Insider

The Pokémon Go ‘Nearby’ tracker now works in New York City.

Pokémon Go is finally fixing its biggest problem.

After months where many players could not find Pokémon in Pokémon Go, players in the U.S. and most of Europe will finally get a working “Nearby” tracker.

Pokémon Go creator Niantic Labs has been slowly making the tracker available to more players in recent weeks — but the basic feature has been restricted to U.S. players west of the Mississippi River until now.

“We will be expanding the Nearby Pokémon feature to the rest of the continental United States and large parts of Europe,” according to a Wednesday blog post by Niantic. “We will continue to review the feedback submitted on our official social media accounts and in other channels and make changes if necessary.”

The tracker allows you to see where Pokémon are located in the game’s map based on their proximity to nearby Pokéstops, which are virtual stops for collecting items that are associated with physical locations in the real world.

Without the tracker, many have been left to blindly stumble upon Pokémon in the game for months. Some players on Reddit have been having trouble with the new tracker’s accuracy, but those issues are hopefully fixed now that Niantic is making it available to everyone.

NOW WATCH: Pokémon GO could be adding 100 new Pokémon very soon — here’s what we know

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Newt Gingrich goes in on Romney, accuses him of ‘sucking up’ to Trump for secretary of state job

John Moore/Getty Images

Newt Gingrich.

Newt Gingrich sounded off Wednesday on Mitt Romney’s latest meeting with President-elect Donald Trump about the secretary of state post.

Gingrich appeared on conservative radio host Laura Ingraham‘s show Wednesday and implied that Romney is “sucking up” to Trump to get the job.

“You have never, ever, in your career seen a wealthy adult who is independent, has been a presidential candidate, suck up at the rate that Mitt Romney is sucking up,” Gingrich said.

The former House speaker is a vocal supporter of Trump and was at one point a contender to be Trump’s running mate. But he has been one of the members of Trump’s inner circle to push back on the idea of Romney as secretary of state. 

Gingrich continued:

“I am confident that he thinks now that he and Donald Trump are the best of friends, they have so many things in common. That they’re both such wise, brilliant people. And I’m sure last night at an elegant three-star restaurant, he was happy to share his version of populism, which involve a little foie gras, a certain amount of superb cooking, but put that in a populist happy manner.”

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential nominee, is apparently still among the top four people under consideration for the secretary of state role. His candidacy has rubbed a few early Trump loyalists the wrong way.

On Tuesday, Bloomberg reported that the search was down to five candidates: 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chair Bob Corker, former CIA Director David Petraeus, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and retired Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly. Trump was meeting with Kelly on Wednesday.

Listen to Gingrich’s interview below:

NOW WATCH: Romney now says Trump may be the man to ‘lead us to that better future’ after previously calling him a ‘phony, a fraud’

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North Carolina allows recount in one county, prolonging America’s longest race for governor

Mike Theiler/Reuters

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory.

The North Carolina state elections board approved Gov. Pat McCrory’s appeal to recount the votes in Durham County, giving a glimmer of hope to his last-ditch attempt to win reelection.

McCrory, a Republican, had claimed that inaccurate ballot machines prevented a proper tally of 90,000 early votes in Durham County, a liberal hotbed that swung the race to Democrat Roy Cooper at the eleventh hour on the night of the election.

Members of the state board said there was sufficient doubt in the outcome to justify recounting the results there, and overturned a November 18 decision by the Durham County elections board that rejected McCrory’s request for a recount.

The state board, consisting of three Republicans and two Democrats, voted 3-2 along party lines to authorize the recount.

“It’s necessary that the public have faith and confidence in the system,” James Baker, a Republican board member, said at the hearing on Wednesday. “Let’s get it all out in the open.”

The decision is good news for McCrory, who is facing calls to concede from opponents, including Cooper himself. His initial Election-Day deficit of about 4,500 votes has mushroomed to more than 10,000 as absentee and provisional ballots are tallied.

Republicans immediately raised questions about the 90,000 votes, which were registered shortly before midnight on November 8, apparently snatching a close victory away from McCrory.

Since Election Day, McCrory has lodged challenges of voter fraud across the state, some of which were dropped due to a lack of evidence. The challenges have prevented some of North Carolina’s 100 counties from reporting official election results.

McCrory filed for a statewide recount last week, but his final deficit must be within 10,000 votes of Cooper for it to happen, according to state law. The Republican said he wouldn’t seek the statewide recount if he won his Durham County appeal.

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

North Carolina Democratic presumptive Governor-elect Roy Cooper waves to a crowd at the North Carolina Democratic Watch Party as he walks on stage with his family on November 9, 2016 in Raleigh, North Carolina.

On Wednesday, Cooper’s attorney Kevin Hamilton argued that McCrory’s team had failed to provide “substantial evidence” of irregularity with the machines in Durham County, as state law requires. Board member Maja Kricker, a Democrat, agreed.

“If we don’t have an irregularity, we’re really going to simply say, ‘Well, people have questions, so we’re going to recount,” Kricker said at the hearing. “How many more questions are going to be raised? In how many other elections is this going to be raised?’”

“This sets a precedent. And I don’t think it’s a precedent we should set.”

In a statement, Cooper campaign manager Trey Nix said, “It is wrong that Governor McCrory continues to waste taxpayer money with false accusations and attempts to delay and that the Republican controlled Board of Elections did not follow the law.”

Nix said the Cooper campaign is “confident” the recount “will confirm Roy Cooper’s election as Governor of North Carolina.”

The machine recount should take about eight hours, election officials said, meaning North Carolinians could learn the result of the election by the end of the week.

The contest between McCrory and Cooper was the closest of any gubernatorial election this year and will be the last in the country to be settled. If McCrory loses, he’ll have the unfortunate distinction of being the only governor nationwide this year — and the first in North Carolina’s history — to lose in a reelection bid.

NOW WATCH: ‘That hypocrisy is also real’ — Jon Stewart takes liberals to task for calling all Trump supporters racist

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Magnus Carlsen wins the 2016 World Championship

Maria Emelianova

Carlsen wins!

NEW YORK — Magnus Carlsen defeated Sergey Karjakin on Wednesday to retain his World Chess Championship title.

Carlsen, from Norway, turned 26 on Wednesday, making the victory a great birthday present. This is the third time he has claimed the biggest trophy in chess.

His 25-year-old Russian challenger was a worthy foe. Through 12 classical games, he held tough, scoring a win and briefly putting Carlsen on the ropes.

But Carlsen stormed back and evened the match with a win of his own. Draws then sent the match to tiebreaks.

In those four 25-minute games, Carlsen’s edge became apparent. Karjakin consistently got into time trouble, not something that you want to happen in “rapid” chess. After a draw in the first game and a miraculous escape by Karjakin, playing black, when Carlsen was on the verge of checkmate in the second game, Karjakin ran out of time in the third, and Carlsen had the decisive point he needed.

With the black pieces in Game 4, Karjakin tried the fighting Sicilian Defense for the first time in the match. It’s an opening he’s played many times, but it’s risky in rapid because although it gives black good winning chances, it demands quite a bit of calculation to establish an edge.

The edge didn’t materialize and Karjakin again ran low on time, amid several flurries of moves with less than minute on his clock. With a checkmate in eight moves on the board, according the computer analysis, and a potentially brilliant queen sacrifice in the works from Carlsen, Karjakin resigned.

Carlsen retained his title, and Karjakin proved himself to have been a hard-fighting, tenacious opponent.

The final position:

Agon

NOW WATCH: Here’s what a computer is thinking when it plays chess against you

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Newt Gingrich goes in on Romney, accuses him of ‘sucking up’ to Trump for secretary of state job

John Moore/Getty Images

Newt Gingrich.

Newt Gingrich sounded off Wednesday on Mitt Romney’s latest meeting with President-elect Donald Trump about the secretary of state post.

Gingrich appeared on conservative radio host Laura Ingraham‘s show Wednesday and implied that Romney is “sucking up” to Trump to get the job.

“You have never, ever, in your career seen a wealthy adult who is independent, has been a presidential candidate, suck up at the rate that Mitt Romney is sucking up,” Gingrich said.

The former House speaker is a vocal supporter of Trump and was at one point a contender to be Trump’s running mate. But he has been one of the members of Trump’s inner circle to push back on the idea of Romney as secretary of state. 

Gingrich continued:

“I am confident that he thinks now that he and Donald Trump are the best of friends, they have so many things in common. That they’re both such wise, brilliant people. And I’m sure last night at an elegant three-star restaurant, he was happy to share his version of populism, which involve a little foie gras, a certain amount of superb cooking, but put that in a populist happy manner.”

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential nominee, is apparently still among the top four people under consideration for the secretary of state role. His candidacy has rubbed a few early Trump loyalists the wrong way.

On Tuesday, Bloomberg reported that the search was down to five candidates: 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chair Bob Corker, former CIA Director David Petraeus, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and retired Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly. Trump was meeting with Kelly on Wednesday.

Listen to Gingrich’s interview below:

NOW WATCH: Romney now says Trump may be the man to ‘lead us to that better future’ after previously calling him a ‘phony, a fraud’

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Pokémon Go is finally fixing its biggest problem for most players

Business Insider

The Pokémon Go ‘Nearby’ tracker now works in New York City.

Pokémon Go is finally fixing its biggest problem.

After months where many players could not find Pokémon in Pokémon Go, players in the U.S. and most of Europe will finally get a working “Nearby” tracker.

Pokémon Go creator Niantic Labs has been slowly making the tracker available to more players in recent weeks — but the basic feature has been restricted to U.S. players west of the Mississippi River until now.

“We will be expanding the Nearby Pokémon feature to the rest of the continental United States and large parts of Europe,” according to a Wednesday blog post by Niantic. “We will continue to review the feedback submitted on our official social media accounts and in other channels and make changes if necessary.”

The tracker allows you to see where Pokémon are located in the game’s map based on their proximity to nearby Pokéstops, which are virtual stops for collecting items that are associated with physical locations in the real world.

Without the tracker, many have been left to blindly stumble upon Pokémon in the game for months. Some players on Reddit have been having trouble with the new tracker’s accuracy, but those issues are hopefully fixed now that Niantic is making it available to everyone.

NOW WATCH: Pokémon GO could be adding 100 new Pokémon very soon — here’s what we know

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Do Fewer Things, Better

I’m going to tell you a secret. I have a very simple, 4-word strategic plan (devised it a few years ago).

Here it is…

Do fewer things, better.

This has made my life — and my work, dramatically better.

Here’s how I execute on my strategic plan:

1. Decide on what matters the most.

2. Say no to everything else.

3. When something falls in the gray area, re-read #2.

Of course, that’s easier to say than do. I fail at it all the time — but I’m getting better. Here are some tips learned from years of practice:

1. When making your list, start with a low-level of abstraction. Resist the temptation to make your list really “high-level”. As an extreme example, one of the things on your priority list shouldn’t be “Be successful”. That’s so broad, that you’d be able to rationalize almost every activity under the sun. Try to be specific enough that the number of things that “fit” is a manageable number. If you find yourself taking on too much (which you probably do), refine your filters and move to a lower-level of abstraction. I’ve written an article on this that you might find useful: “The Power of Focus and The Peril of Myopia“.

2. Forgive yourself for having to say “no” to things not on your “fewer things” list. Years ago, I wrote a blog post asking public forgiveness , you can see it here at http://MustSayNo.com. Of all the articles I’ve ever written, that one has had the most positive impact on my life.

3. Remember that every time you say “no” to something you might have said “yes” to, it frees up time to focus on the things that matter. And the more time you spend on the things that matter, the better you get at them. Let me give you an example: Let’s say you say “no” to some project/request/idea that would have “only” taken a few hours a month, because it didn’t make the “few things that matter” list. And, let’s say that one of the things that matter to you is being able to better communicate your message to the world — via public speaking. Those few hours you “saved” can be spent on getting your message out. More speaking gigs, more people influenced. But wait! That’s not all! Not only are you able to do some more public speaking, because you’re going to spend more time on it, you’re going to get better at it. And, because you get better at it, you’re going to get more frequent speaking invites. With larger audiences. And have more influence once you’re on stage. You’re building leverage by getting better and better at the thing that matters. And, it’s amazing how much better you will get, once you decide on only a few things to get better at.

By the way, the reverse of this is true to: Everytime you say “yes” to something, you’re saying “no” to something else. Often, you’re saying “no” to something more important.

4. Fight the FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) emotion. It’s a killer. We all have it to varying degrees. This fear that if we don’t say “yes” to something, we’re going to miss out on some big opportunity, small joy or new connection. Yes, sometimes you will miss out, but that’s OK. Life goes on. On average, you will be better off skipping some things, instead of trying to do too much.

More people fail from a gluttony of good activities than from being starved of them.

5. Be super-careful with recurring commitments. If you are going to occasionally say “yes” to things that are not on your “things that matter most” list, be super-careful that they’re not a recurring commitment. A one-time commitment of 4 hours is much less dangerous than a monthly hourly committment. The way I think about this: When I say “yes” to a recurring committment, I’m effectively saying “yes’ multiple times (for as long as I think I’m going to be in that committment). Which brings me to the next point…

6. As painful as it is, prune your prior committments. If you are like me (and apologies if you are), you’ve said yes to a few things that you now sort of regret. Get yourself out of those. Be respectful, be, understanding and be fair — but be disciplined and true to yourself. And just because you committed to something last year with no real “expiration date” doesn’t mean you have to keep doing it forever. Things change. On a related note: For things that don’t have an expiration date, remember that it’s going to be just as painful to prune later as it is now — why not give yourself the gift of some time back sooner?

7. Try to solve for outcome, not activity. Figure out what you want to happen (whether it be a commercial interest or a philanthropic one), and figure out how to best create impact. Usually, optimal outcomes are not achieved by saying “yes” to a bunch of “good” activities (however well-intentioned).

On the point of philanthropy, you might be wondering: “What about doing good, and giving back?”

Warning: My opinion here may be controversial for some and feel beknighted and self-serving to others. Sorry.

First off, if you have the ability to give back, you should do so. No doubt. But the question is, how do you optimimize for outcome?

Let me explain with a personal example. I’m an entrepreneur. Have been for most of my professional career. I LOVE STARTUPS. THEY BRING ME GREAT JOY. I’m one of the co-founders of HubSpot (NYSE:HUBS). I’m also a big fan of Boston and want to see the Boston startup ecosystem grow and thrive.

But a few years ago, I decided to dramatically limit the time I spend directly helping entrepreneurs and the Boston ecosystem.

Why would I do this? Isn’t that selfish? Yes, I guess it is.

I’m a big, big believer in leverage and scale. I like to spend my calories in ways that deliver the greatest impact and the best outcomes. I’m actually quite geeked out on that idea.

The reason I made this decision was that I felt the best way for me to help the startup ecosystem — was to use my time to help make HubSpot a super-successful company. The by-product of that success will be much greater than what I’d get if I were just directly trying to help a handful of startups.

So far, HubSpot has had some modest success. We are a publicly traded now and have 1,000+ people working at the company. We have many that have “graduated” HubSpot and gone off to start their own companies or join other teams. We’ve also made a bunch of people money (several of whom are channeling some of that back into to the ecosystem by way of angel investing). We’ve improved Boston’s “brand” as being a place where big tech companies can still be built (which helps pull in more capital, talent and interest). All in, I’d say we’re a net positive.

But, fact remains that instead of being a mentor/advisor/mensch — I’ve sort of been a schmuck when it comes to where I spend my time. My money is a different matter — I’ve made 60+ angel investments. But, I’ve been fiercely protecting of my time and I’ve said “no” to just about everything. And remember, I LOVE STARTUPS. I love helping them. I love the thrill, joy and fulfillment. But, I said “no” anyways. And, I may be rationalizing here — but I think I’ve likely done more for the ecosystem than if I had simply gone to more events, tried to pick a handful of startups to be an advisor/mentor for, etc.

This section got much longer than I planned for it to be. I have a whole other article in draft-mode titled “The Surgeon In The Soup Kitchen”. I’ll give you the abridged message of that post:

Don’t favor what feels the most good. Favor what does the most good.

Thankfully, blogging is a high-leverage activity. And, since I’m using HubSpot to write/promote/track this article, it helps HubSpot too. So, I can rationalize this into my “fewer things” list.

Cheers, and best wishes with your “fewer things”.

Compassion in the Midst of Madness

By Leo Babauta

Whether you’re in the U.S. or not, the results of yesterday’s election can bring up some strong feelings — maybe outrage or depression, maybe elation and shock, maybe contempt for others.

In this crazy emotional time, I urge you to try a compassion practice.

Perhaps, like some people I know, you are angry about the outcome, and can’t believe your fellow Americans would elect the person they elected. Perhaps you’re feeling vindicated, and are unhappy with the way your fellow Americans have steered this country for the last eight years. Perhaps you’re not from the U.S., and you’re feeling scorn for Americans, or confusion, after the results of this election.

Whatever you’re feeling, it’s likely to come from a place of non-understanding. That’s not likely to help our community, locally or globally, nor will it help our own happiness. It can be a transformative practice to practice compassion right now.

The truth is, we each have personally experienced what the other side is going through. The results of the election represent the feelings of millions of other people — they speak in some way for our fellow human beings. We have each felt these emotions: feeling left behind, feeling frustrated, distrusting, powerless, angry, hopeful for change, disliking the change that we see.

Imagine yourself feeling those feelings, one at a time. Feel how difficult they are. Now imagine that someone from the other side is feeling those things.

See if you can feel compassion for a fellow human being for feeling them. Feel a connection to them, because you too have suffered through this difficulty. Feel a connection to all your fellow humans who are going through their difficulties right now, in the U.S. and around the world.

We are connected, even if we have immense differences. We live and work together, we feed each other and depend on each other, we support each other and share ideas, we all are going through immense change and struggle, we have struggles in our lives and feel helpless to change the world at large.

The other “side” might have a different worldview that causes them to vote a different way than you, to want different policies … but underneath, we all have the same tender hearts. And by finding this common ground, we can reconnect to each other in a compassionate way.

Justin Trudeau walks back his comments on Fidel Castro after getting slammed for praising the dictator

REUTERS/Eric Vidal

Justin Trudeau.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau clarified his comments on the death of Cuban president Fidel Castro after being harshly criticized for them.

Trudeau said at a news conference on Sunday that his statement on Castro’s passing was meant “to recognize … a former head of state” that Canada has ties to, and not to overlook Castro’s history of human rights abuses, Reuters reported.

“The fact is Fidel Castro had a deep and lasting impact on the Cuban people,” Trudeau said at the news conference.

“He certainly was a polarizing figure and there certainly were significant concerns around human rights, that’s something I’m open about and that I’ve highlighted,” Trudeau said on Sunday. He also acknowledged that Castro was a dictator when a CBC News reporter asked him about it.

In a statement released soon after Castro died, Trudeau expressed “deep sorrow” over his death and called him a “larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century.”

“A legendary revolutionary and orator, Mr. Castro made significant improvements to the education and healthcare of his island nation,” the original statement read.

Castro did garner support for improving access to healthcare and education for the poor, but was also known for ruthlessly suppressing any kind of dissent.

In 1976, Trudeau’s father, former prime minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau, became the first NATO leader to visit Cuba since its revolution. Canada maintained relations with the island nation during America’s decades-long embargo.

Though Trudeau did acknowledge in the original statement that Castro was a “controversial” figure, he followed that by praising Castro’s “tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people.”

Quickly after the statement was released, critics slammed Trudeau’s comments. ;

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who is of Cuban descent, tweeted, “Is this a real statement or parody? Because if this is a real statement from the PM of Canada it is shameful and embarrassing.”

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz echoed Rubio’s remarks, tweeting that Trudeau’s comments were “disgraceful.”

The hashtag #TrudeauEulogies began trending on Twitter Saturday, jokingly expressing praise for fictional tyrants like Darth Vader from Star Wars and President Snow from The Hunger Games.

NOW WATCH: Obama gives Trump advice during their first White House meeting

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The most overpriced restaurants in London, according to people who live there

Mark Brumell

A platter of five varieties of sashimi at London’s most overpriced restaurant will set you back £65.

While there are plenty of budget-friendly food options in England’s capital, dining in some restaurants – and in some neighbourhoods – can come with a staggeringly steep price tag.

Harden’s London Restaurants Guide for 2017, released Wednesday, revealed the results of its 26th annual survey of 7,500 regular restaurant-goers to determine not only which restaurants are the city’s favourites, but also which are the most overpriced.

The guide’s co-founder Peter Harden told Business Insider: “When people submit a restaurant nomination, they have an option of doing so in one of 18 categories. The categories include top gastronic experience, favourite restaurant and most overpriced.”

The winners are then determined by the number of votes within each category.

With restaurants opening at the fastest rate ever over the past 12 months according to the guide, it’s more important than ever to make sure you’re getting the most for your pound when dining out.

The average price of dinner for one at the restaurants in the guide was also up by 1.7% to £51.37 this year, compared to £50.51 last year.

Despite this, Harden told Business Insider: “I don’t think it’s an overpriced city for eating out at all. Regularly people come to London from the sticks and say the prices are shocking, but it’s nonsense. Even though costs here are high, the level of competition is so very intense and the market is so deep that most of the better value eating in the country is to be had in London.”

Whether you’re willing to splash out or budget dining is more your style, see which restaurants the city’s foodies consider to be the most overpriced below – along with what you can expect to pay for some of their top dishes.

10. Hutong at The Shard

 

A meal with a view at this modern Chinese restaurant at the top of the Shard doesn’t come cheap – a hot and sour soup will set you back £8, while the sautéed crispy shredded beef and chilli dish served with carrot and garlic is £28.50.

9. Alain Ducasse, Dorchester

 

You won’t get a meal for under £100 at this French restaurant, where three courses from the a la carte menu come in at £100, with a tasting menu for £140.

8. Le Gavroche

 

There are no prices listed on the website’s sample a la carte menus – a sign in itself that a meal doesn’t come cheap – and the tasting menu without wine, which includes the likes of this roast loin of venison, is £130.

7. Pollen Street Social

 

A small dish like these langoustines with an onion squash & vanilla purée costs £19.50 at this Michelin-starred modern British spot.

6. The Chiltern Firehouse

 

Even brunch comes with a hefty price tag at this celebrity favourite, with this small (albeit delicious-looking) portion of french toast with smoked bacon and spiced maple syrup costing £14

However, Harden said the restaurant has fallen from its previous third spot on the most overpriced list. “Whether its a factor of them becoming less overpriced or slightly less fashionable I’m not quite sure,” he said.

5. Marcus

 

According to Harden, Marcus is “a restaurant that needs sorting out,” up on the list from sixth place last year.

3 courses cost £85, and past dishes have included the likes of this cod dish.

4. Gordon Ramsay

 

“Gordon Ramsay is fourth on the list,” said Harden. “No real surprises there – it’s not a restaurant which has been particularly distinguished in recent times, and it’s not surprising to see it be dissappointing.”

Three courses at Gordon’s Ramsay’s famous restaurant will set you back £110, with main dishes including the likes of this poached Isle of Gigha halibut with Atlantic king crab.

 

3. Oxo Tower Restaurant

 

While the views of the Thames may be stunning, a main such as this dry aged beef fillet with cauliflower, truffles and cocoa nib sauce will mean shelling out £38.

“The Oxo tower has held the distinction of being the most overpriced for about 10 years, but there’s been a bit of a shakeup in the last couple of years,” Harden said. 

2. The River Cafe

 

With a menu that changes every day, most ‘primi’ pasta dishes at this cult riverside Italian come in at around £18 to £20, while starter dishes like calamari cost £20 and ‘secondi’ plates such as the “Gallo Cedrone,” or whole Yorkshire Grouse served with potatoes and watercress, have a price tag around £40. 

“Last year The River Cafe beat out Oxo Tower by being so expensive – despite being very good, people became outraged by the prices,” Harden said. 

1. Sexy Fish

 

A platter of five varieties of sashimi will set you back £65 and the assorted sushi plate comes in at £28.60 at Sexy Fish, which is officially the most overpriced restaurant in London according to the city’s foodies.

“It’s a restaurant which has achieved a lot of buzz, and it’s the first time they’ve achieved this slightly dubious distinction,” Harden said. “It came in not having been previously ranked – that was quite interesting.”

 

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